News Round-up November 1st-7th

Bioscience news 1

 

 

 

Hello, and welcome to the #bioscinews round-up! This is the place where you can find all the important biosci new stories from the past week, in a short, digestible paragraph.

This week’s news

Recently, the a fossil of a Ornithomimus dinosaur was found with preserved skin and feather structures, helping confirm the long-standing theory that some dinosaurs had feathers. The feather and skin patterns also help give insight into how these dinosaurs may have regulated their body temperatures.

CSyvDw2WsAAY2Aw

Credit: J Csotonyi

Continuing with the fossil-related news, a new study proposed that limb-regeneration was ubiquitous in the ancestors of modern tetrapods. This means that this ability has likely been lost in most current tetrapod lineages. Keeping this evolutionary information in mind may lead to a better understanding of limb regeneration and why humans are not capable of this.

Limb regeneration

Antibiotic resistance is a problem in modern medicine, and one that threatens to undo all of the progress modern medicine has had regarding infectious disease. There are many different approaches to this problem, but a new approach harnessing currently used antibiotics and antibodies has proved very successful in rats, although it remains to be seen how successful it may be in humans.

Antibiotic Resistance

Credit: NIH/Wikimedia commons

Hope you enjoyed this week’s news round-up, thanks for reading!

Devon Smith, The University of Sheffield, @devoncaira

Julie Blommaert, The University of Innsbruck, @jblommaert92

Advertisements

News Round-Up October 5th-11th

Bioscience news 1

Hello, and welcome to the #bioscisews round-up! This is the place where you can find all the important biosci new stories from the past week, in a short, digestible paragraph.

This week’s news

Pitcher plants’ ant trap. Until recently, carnivorous plants fell into two classes, active and passive, based on how they ‘receive’ their prey. Venus fly traps are an example of ‘active’ carnivorous plants, while all pitcher plants were thought to be ‘passive’. However a species of pitcher plant has now been classified as a ‘free energy’ species, as it uses the force of raindrops hitting its unique lid, to fling ants into its pitcher for digestion.

ants crawling on a pitcher plant leaf

Image Source

Mammals flourish at Chernobyl. The human exclusion zone around the Chernobyl nuclear reactor is acting as the perfect method of creating a virtually human free nature reserve, and a long-term study has found that mammals appear to be flourishing under these conditions.

Roe deer near Chernobyl nuclear power plant (c) Tatyana Deryabina

Image Source

Decline of the cactus? A global study has concluded that almost one third of cactus species are under threat, due to over harvesting, slow growth and small distribution range.

Carnegiea gigantea (Image: Craig Hilton-Taylor)

Image Source

Hope you enjoyed this week’s news round-up, thanks for reading!

Stewart Barker                                                                                                                   The University of Sheffield                                                                                                     @Stewart_Barker

News Round-Up August 31st – September 13th

Bioscience news 1

Hello, and welcome to the #bioscisews round-up! This is the place where you can find all the important biosci new stories from the past week, in a short, digestible paragraph.

This week’s news

A cure for jetlag? Researchers in Austria have found that, if you can stomach it, a blood transfusion could alleviate symptoms of jet lag. It appears that a lack of sleep has a severe effect on red blood cells, so replenishing them should help reverse the effects of jet lag! On a serious note, this could potentially be very useful for shift workers, where incidences of heart disease are higher.

Image Source

Meningitis and starting university. If you are starting university or even returning, it is important you know about meningitis, and how to recognise the symptoms – it could save a life. Common symptoms can include:

  • Fever with cold hands and feet
  • Vomiting
  • Severe muscle pain
  • Severe headache
  • Sensitive to bright lights
  • A distinctive rash
  • Drowsiness and difficulty waking up

Meningitis bacteria, SEM

Image Source

The importance of iron-oxidising bacteria. A new study has indicated that iron-oxidising bacteria probably sustained the global carbon cycle prior to oxygen dependent species arising.

Image Source

New human ancestor discovered The announcement of the discovery of ancient hominid fossils in South Africa got evolutionary biologists really excited. The original paper is open access, and there is some wonderful coverage by National Geographic.

Hand and foot

Image Source

Hope you enjoyed this week’s news round-up, thanks for reading!

Stewart Barker                                                                                                                   The University of Sheffield                                                                                                     @Stewart_Barker

News Round-Up August 16th-22nd

Bioscience news 1

Hello, and welcome to the #bioscisews round-up! This is the place where you can find all the important biosci new stories from the past week, in a short, digestible paragraph.

This week’s news

Publication of the California two-spot octopus genome. This was an investigation into the unique neural and morphological features of cephalopods, and has lead to some speculation of the evolution of brains in non-mammals.

Image source

Novel regenerative cell line discovered in mouse livers. After the previous discovery that cells are thought to differentiate into new hepatocytes (therefore having the ability to repair the liver), they actually differentiated into a different cell type. And the hunt was on for the progenitor cells. This study suggests they have been found in the liver of mice!

hybrid hepatocyets

Image Source

Ancient cats outcompeted ancient dogs. Actually, it’s not as simple as that. The diversification of ancient carnivores in North America was heavily affected by other carnivorous families. At least two families of canids (dogs), were outcompeted by other canids, and felids (Cats), which then proliferated further in their absence, affecting the canid species present today. So it’s not a case of cats versus dogs, it’s more of a carnivorous free-for-all!

Image Source

Book pages that clean water. The ‘Drinkable Book’ contains both a guide on why water should be filtered, with pages that can be removed and used to purify a reported 100 L of water. The paper contains nanoparticles of copper and silver, commonly used in hospitals for their antibacterial properties.

A man leafing through the book

Image Source

20 year old frozen sperm helps to save a critically endangered ferret species. In a remarkable effort to save the critically endangered black-footed ferret, conservationists have produced highly important, genetically variable offspring from artificial insemination using sperm frozen 20 years ago. This is impressive from a technological perspective, as it shows that artificial insemination with 20 year old sperm is possible, raising hopes for other endangered species. Additionally, not relying on the current small pool of genetic diversity but instead mixing in some diversity from several generations back, can offer some increased diversity and prevent potential deadly genetic bottlenecks commonly seen in species brought back from the brink of extinction.

Image Source

Hope you enjoyed this week’s news round-up, thanks for reading!

Stewart Barker                                                                                                                   The University of Sheffield                                                                                                     @Stewart_Barker

Julie Blommaert                                                                                                             @Julie_B92