Blogging: good or bad procrastination?

Okay, so I know I’m relatively new to the blogging world, but already I find myself loving it and continuously want to post and post and post…

Although I think it is a great way communicate ideas, opinions and funny facts, or just simply have a nosey at what everyone else is up to, I have been left thinking… is it a good or a bad distraction? For instance, I am currently meant to be starting a literature review for my PhD, however all I want to do is blog and write summary articles relating to current science news. At least the latter may actually help! 🙂

Let me backtrack a little so you’re up to date – I recently started writing articles for my old University newspaper, where I actually got a few articles published (shocked?! Me too!). They were only small articles, for example I did one on the development of breathalysers to detect Parkinson’s disease, but having them published is such a sense of achievement. This is a similar feeling I get when I post a new blog. It’s so great to see the views tallying up and having people I’ve never met before like my blog, or better yet, re-blog it! Knowing that people are reading my work and may like it or want to read more makes me feel proud and helps to boost my confidence – which is never a bad thing, despite what most people think!

So back to the requirements of my PhD… I have a deadline for Janurary, which may seem quite far away for now, but I am doing a PhD and that means I always have a lot going on. Nevertheless, it needs to be done and it is still important. But all I want to do right now is write about new science-related topics and make sure everyone knows about them. Being a newbie ‘SciCommer’ I am very much getting involved in wanting all audiences to understand about the science world and what kind of research is going on out there that could potentially help them one day. Or just attract their interest.

Even though blogging and writing articles is distracting me from my university work, is it really a bad thing?! I think not. Okay yes, I’m probably not spending as much time as I should be on my written projects, but I am fitting my writing around my lab work. This shows organisational and multi-tasking skillsgreat aspects to include on my CV. It also helps me to engage more with the news, keeping up to date with what is going on across the globe, a job I used to find quite difficult. What’s even better is that I am learning about all types of science, not just my own area of interest. I think this is imperative, as most jobs require a broad knowledge base and not just a specific understanding of a subject. Additionally, this allows me to develop and grow my intellect, adding to my scientific expertise. And last but not least, I am beginning to network and interact with fellow scientists, scientific communicators, students and lecturers, growing discussions and sharing ideas and opinions. I now find myself being more acquainted with different subjects in greater detail, enabling me to discuss these topics with co-workers, colleagues and lecturers, when previously I was nervous to do so as I felt inexperienced and that I lacked specific familiarity. I am also writing for my own selfish desires: because I enjoy it! And that can’t be a bad thing, surely?!

Credit: funny-joke.com

Credit: funny-joke-pictures.com

So taking all this into account, I think writing in an informal and ‘chatty’ manner, in contrast to the strict and awkward way in which we have to write to gain attention within University and the science world, is surprisingly helping my career in many ways. And even if it is classed as ‘procrastination’ in some people’s eyes, I believe it is good procrastination – disagree with me if you must!

 

 

 

Devon Smith

The University of Sheffield

@devoncaira

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